Carlos A. Gil: Apparent Spaces/ Extended

The exhibition has been extended to February 2021 and is on view by appointment only.

Sign up slots are available to limit the number of attendees to a maximum of five (5) people. If you need assistance signing up as a group, please contact Taller at info@tallerpr.org or call 215.426.3311.

On view by appointment only

Mask must be worn in the gallery and around Taller and social distancing observed.


Physically we inhabit a space, but mentally (in our memories) we are inhabited by others.

Carlos A. Gil
Hakuña IV, 2020 
Archival pigment print collage

Nature and the digital hand merge in Carlos Gil’s photographer’s eye (b. Caracas, Ven., 1943). Intervening in the pictorial, and working in collage, photography, and digital manipulation, Gil creates haunting imagery based on nature and geometry. In his exhibition, Apparent Spaces, he presents 47 new assemblages and collages from the last five years depicting details and landscapes in Hawaii, Florida, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania.

In the pandemic, his poignant pictures bring to light an environment that is both edged and enigmatic. In addition to recent work, the exhibition will include an installation that will go in the center of the gallery space. The show will also include an online portfolio and a videotaped interview about his process. 

Shot with a Nikon D300, Gil photographic work is digitally edited and manually manipulated, reassembled, and intricately layered, testing the limits of representation and abstraction. This exhibition of Gils brings appreciation to a gifted and nuanced artist who has been steadily creating important work in Philadelphia since 1994. Gil is known for creating work that captures the natural world’s beauty and wonder and its fragility that is caused by human activity and climate change.

Gil earned a degree in fine arts at the Cristobal Rojas School in Caracas and mastered printmaking, engraving, and analog photography in Europe. In the 1960s, he lived in the Netherlands, Yugoslavia, and Spain, where he studied graphic design.

Read Jesenia de Moya Correa interview in the Inquirer here.

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